To the Cee

Day 36…or Day 2 (43km)
Vilaserio – Cee

We awake to “clear” dark skies and the twinkling of stars.  We wrap our packs in their rain covers and put our rain gear at the top of our packs, just in case.  We walk in the pitch black of the morning, as ambient light is non-existent.  

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When the sun rises, we stop in our tracks and drink it, and the serenity of the morning, in.  This route is truly the best kept secret of the Camino.  Of all tracks of the Camino (the Frances route), we would do this again.  

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Accents of color against a rich green background appear sparingly along our way.  In Galicia, many homes have narrow wooden structures (Hórreo) perched upon pedestals that were once used as granaries. Their engineering is such that mice and other rodents can not get into the grain or vegetables stored within.

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It is here that we start to encounter Hórreos made (with the exception of the doors) entirely out of what appears to be hand hewn stone.

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Some are in use as intended, but most are “lawn art”, and designed to show and celebrate one’s heritage as a Galician.  

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After our morning coffe stop in San Mariña, rain threatens and then delivers in a fierce manner with lingering hailstones lounging on the trail.  

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Not to worry, as it is followed by magnificent rainbows that stretch the width of the sky.  

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We find ourselves wet, but not miserable as the magic and tranquility of today’s scenery and tread fill us with awe.  

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Managed groves of eucalyptus and pine outlined with short stone “fences” lead the Way. Bright white windmills “decorate” the ridgeline.

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Dairy cows in route to milking overtake the narrow streets of small villages.

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We spy a giant metal structure in the far distance atop a steep mountain and wonder what it might be, thinking that we will never find out, as surely we aren’t headed “that way”.  Funny thing is, and we should know this by now, that when we spy a distant object at the top of a mountain, or path we’d rather avoid, we end up walking that path and/or at the foot of the object.  This was no different, for when we turn a “corner” we find ourselves at the top of said mountain and at the foot of said object.  We joke that it is probably a billboard for an albergue in the city of Cee.  Today was an all or nothing day.  Once we pass Olveira, there is pretty much nothing inbetween before we reach Cee.  We are through Olveira realtively “early”, and the rain has been mild, so we roll the dice and continue to Cee.  

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We get our first glimpse of the Atlantic Ocean through the mist.  Holy Crap!  The Atlantic ocean!  This is COOL!  We have walked over the Pyrenees, to the ocean!  

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We hit a “fork” in the road.  Finisterre or Muxía?  This time it will be Finisterre (which is now spelled Fisterra).  

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We make a left turn, and soon are greeted with signs tacked to trees for albergues.  
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After a while, (which includes a “short” but torrential downpour) we tackle an extremely steep and rocky 2KM descent that brings us into Cee.  

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We are tired and sore, but elated for tomorrow’s finish at the “End of the World”.
Buen Camino!

Be Strong!  Austin Strong!

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